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president eisenhower's years in the white house. and jon meacham's new book is "thomas jefferson: the art of power" and it just debuted right up there at the top of the "new york times" bestseller list. it's now at number two. well thank you for coming. you know, as i read these books-- and, evan, i finished yours last night-- something occurred to me. lincoln, jefferson, eisenhower, they were all great negotiators. they were all compromisers. and then i read your book earlier this year, bob woodward, about president obama and this stalemate over trying to find some kind of way to keep the government running here in washington. it occurs to me that what seems to be lacking these days is this ability of modern politicians to compromise. i sometimes wonder if they-- if they've forgotten how to do it. >> one theme is the president, no matter who is president, is the chief strategist. they set the tone. they say this is how we're going to do things and fix things. in the case of obama and the first term, and the economic issues, he didn't fix them. and he didn't find a way to work his will. a
president eisenhower a little bit, about a minute of it, and it's about the cuban missile crisis. how many different topic areas do you have in the book besides the cuban missile crisis? >> about eight. there's history, politics, civil rights, cuba, vietnam, the world as it is, which is a summary of all of the world's problems, and the burden and the glory -- sounds like a little bit less than eight. but the burden and the glory is about the difficulty of being president and what it's like on a daily basis to occupy this terribly difficult job. >> on october 22, 1962, where are we in the cuban missile crisis when we hear this conversation? >> we're right smack in the middle of it. that's the day he gave his speech to the nation informing americans about the crisis. he had had the luxury of almost a week of near total blackout of the news to deliberate with his top advisors. but on monday, october 22, he gave a speech to the nation. 100 million americans listened to that speech and it was one of the most listened-to speeches in the history of the presidency. that's the day of this call to e
time ago. we'll talk about the days of eisenhower. this is "hardball," the place for politics. ♪ i'd like to thank eating right, whole grain, multigrain cheerios! mom, are those my jeans? [ female announcer ] people who choose more whole grain tend to weigh less than those who don't. multigrain cheerios brotherhood. this is "hardball," the place it's changing the conversation. ♪ for an old birther like louie, for politics. >>> house speaker john boehner, the aforementioned speaker, is now 1 for 20. he's finally named a woman, believe it or not, to serve as one of his chairs in the 20 house committees he oversooes. congresswoman candice miller of michigan will chair the house administration committee, it's a big one. the republicans took a lot of heat after announcing the other 19 house committees will all be headed by, there they are, men. we'll be right back. sports coe that likes to hug curves. we'll be right back. ♪ your curves. smooth, rich, never bitter, gevalia. heat after announcing the other >>> welcome back to "hardball." there's a reason mitt romney's team seemed conf
congress to region to the president's prerogative and they did it. >>host: was president eisenhower a fan the? >> neither truman norah eisenhower they're both army veterans. but president that the mood -- marines have the propaganda machine. but then to get their special protection it was fun. >>host: relay marine? >> i joined 1995 out of college i served on active duty five years and then the reserves. >> where have you served? >> afghanistan. and also camper issue in. >>host: what are some of the tensions the marines have because there is a dependent relationship? >> there are not major tensions now but you can hide in the past without too much work for the president. of the modern court today is the. >> line has been spent two negative time we pay for the equipment that you use. and you should read the help o -- helpful we're here. after rover to the story changed if you lose the navy. >> the relationship in the global but the power is radically different now than screw my then they created office wit
have had a separate outcome. eisenhower said that he learned that we were going to drop the bomb in the japanese and eisenhower said he got depressed. he said we don't need to do it. first of all, the japanese are defeated and ready to surrender. and i would hate to see our country to be the first to use that kind of weapon. you had animals against that kind of weapon. the japanese do you had the admirals' against that kind of weapon. the japanese emperor was asking for peace. the bomb was dropped on japan in a literal sense. but on a symbolic sense, a it was struck on the soviet union. we were sending a message to the soviet union that, if you mess with us, you will really be getting it. tavis: depending on where you are watching this program tonight, we may mean not know who the next president is. if we do have a new president, congratulations, i think? [laughter] one thing we do know is that, in the four debates leading up to the election, there was not a single question about poverty in the last election between obama and mccain. >> middle-class, middle class, middle-class. t
with the story. one evening in 1954 at the next exited the dinner was president eisenhower's who's going to speak. an indian woman sitting on the bench at the banquet hall. when he said no to continue down the stairs. halfway down the amount of the woman with the woman was sitting. i spoke with a woman and asked her if they had not met previously. when the woman replied that they had come a pat asked about her stay in the u.s. acquired wishers in the hallway. the woman explained she was returning in a few days and hope to catch a glance of the president before she went home. i've been arranged for the woman to be given a seat at the dinner so she could hear the speech. nixon then lost the hearts are continuing to the previous engagement. i use the story to be different type visit to exemplify several key points i wish to make about pat nixon and her public role. more particularly about her role as foreign diplomat. the path that a woman during one of her trial a second review. the traveling she does was the best part of her job as a political wife. sector, is not the wife of ambassador were state
eisenhower has been delayed until next year. our review of the design -- eisenhower's family has not agreed on a final design, which they say is extravagant given the former president's humble beginnings. the commission will consider the project sometime in 2013. >> a school in prince george's county is celebrating its 10th anniversary and honoring one of its former students. they named it after corporal eugene mills. he was killed while serving in afghanistan. it has about 70 students. >> still to come -- instead of polls, a new suggestion to pay for road work around our area. how much it will cost. >> find out where you can get a discounted turkey meal for your family. >> clear skies, chilly temperatures outside. will it stay like this for the >> thanksgiving is less than a week away. help us arrive for some people who may need help this holiday. >> natasha barrett has more on a generous donation. >> thanksgiving. to many, it is a day off. or a time to spend with your family. but many others cannot worry about that. they are worried about feeding their family. and 11,000 turkeys and all t
madison, andrew jackson, theodore roosevelt, dwight eisenhower, rall reagan and bill clinton. lincoln has a special case in the successful second term. it's interesting to note that only the president had a more successful second term than the first or james madison and andrew jackson. the following is an accounting of the president elected to the second term and the reason for those are the trouble second term. member for field because of the war that seemed on winnable or for lack of preparedness. jefferson, truman, johnson and bush were the four. also failed because of economic crisis or the failure to act to detour such a crisis and these were jefferson, cleveland, coolidge, franklin roosevelt with a 37 downturn and george bush to eight failed due to their inability to leave with jefferson, wilson, truman, johnson, nixon and bush. they failed to to franklin roosevelt and richard nixon. four of them did not effectively communicate this agenda or initiative were jefferson, monroe, grant and cleveland. obviously the dominant source of failure for the second term prudent has been their in
to explain why he did this because as you describe it, it sounds crazy. johnson like kennedy, like eisenhower like truman let's forget about thompson for a minute, from truman, eisenhower and kennedy all three presidents were on record as was a majority of the congress saying that the united states, the head of the free world and what was still a very strong climate of course the bay of pigs happened just a couple years before that in 1962. but the united states had the responsibility to protect the independence of nations from communist aggression and this was south vietnam. kennedy had raised troop levels. i won't go into all the things truman and eisenhower did but right along we are very heavily involved in protecting south vietnam and johnson believed that these prior commitments committed him. he also was a strong warrior and he used, and often on how the young people who were protesting simply didn't understand communism because they had never grown up and had to fight world war ii. they didn't know what appeasement was and chamberlain and so forth given to the nazis. the united states
, theodore roosevelt, dwight eisenhower, ronald reagan and bill clinton. lincoln is a special case and that his successful second term was so brief. it is interesting to note-only presidents who had a more successful second term than their first word james madison and andrew jackson. the following is an accounting of the president's elected to a second term and the reason for those of experience failed or troubled second terms. four failed because of a war that seemed unwinnable war for lack of preparedness. jefferson, truman, johnson and. were the four. also four failed because of economic crisis or failure to act to deter such a crisis. jefferson, cleveland, coolidge, franklin roosevelt, the 37 downturn and george bush. eight who failed due to their inability to lead congress were jefferson, monroe, grant, wilson, truman, johnson, nixon and george bush. two failed due to who boris. franklin roosevelt and richard nixon. four who did not effectively communicate their agendas or initiatives were jefferson, monroe, grand and cleveland. the dominant force of failure for a second term
exception american hero. he is like eisenhower. eisenhower had an affair also and he didn't resign. the idea that david petraeus can be blackmailed because he has a woman friend is totally ridiculous. this man -- this man has put his life at risk for his country over and over again. somebody's going to come to him and say, you better give us secrets or i'm going to tell your wife you have a girlfriend. at some pointo have to grow up. half our presidents would have had to resign over this. >> greta: let me play devil's advocate, if he is vulnerable enough to want to hide something, the reason why you tell all in these investigations, when you get the job, you want to disclose them is so that you don't become material for blackmail. >> right. >> greta: there is also the added problem, that as a man of his great stature tdoes send a message to others in the military about -- about honor, trust and discipline, which is so important -- >> you know -- but, greta, this has been going on for 2,000 years. and under this standard, we probably would have lost half of our generals and half our president
at the dinner that president eisenhower's going to speak that they came across an indian woman sitting on a bench by the banquet hall. potshots you recognized the woman. when he said now come and they continue the stairs. halfway down, pack remember the one minute major has been returned to where the woman was sitting. i spoke with a woman and asked her if they had not previously. when the woman replied they had, pat asked about her stay in the u.s. and implied what she was doing in the hallway. the woman explained she was returning to india in a few days and hope to catch a glimpse of the president before she went home. have been arranged for the woman to be given a seat at the dinner so she could hear the speech as well as see the president. nixon then left the hall to continue on to the previous engagement. i use this story to begin my topic because i think it exemplifies several key points i wish to make about pat nixon public role. more particularly as foreign diplomat. patton at the indian woman during one of her travels the second lady. the traveling she did as first and second
for decades now. meet a san francisco woman who remembers work the polls when eisenhower was running for president. >> hi i'm meteorologist lawrence karnow in the cbs 5 weather center. temperatures soaring to possible record levels again today but a major cooldown is in the works too. we'll talk about that coming up. ,,,,,,,,,, ,,,,,, about long experience. but n there's a bay area woman whs worked every presidential election since 1952. >>> some poll workers can talk about long experience then there's a bay area woman who worked every presidential election since 1952. cbs 5 reporter elissa harrington is here in san francisco where today that woman is getting some much deserved recognition. >> reporter: at 1:30, secretary of state debra bowen will honor elisa kennedy, 96 years old. this is her garage which is a polling place. and she is taking a well deserved break right now. that's you're not seeing her. but she is the longest running poll worker in the state. >> wh... >> reporter: every election 96- year-old elisa kennedy invites voters into the garage of her san francisco home. it
. i do not think we can afford to do that. we did not use to do that. dwight eisenhower carried on with his chauffeur, a very good- looking red-haired british woman. he was not fired. ike, you gotta go home, you had an affair. that would be crazy. that is kind of what we're doing these days. i think president obama should have said, you screwed up. you need to go home, make amends to your wife, do whatever you need to go -- do whatever you need to do. get some of that kobe bryant jewelry. your punishment -- you are staying in your job because your country needs you. i am sorry we throw them away. here is a guy who did three combat tours in iraq, a year in afghanistan. he and his family have given an awful lot to this country since 9/11. when the time came for us to be generous, we were not. i think it does say more about us than him. tavis: when you suggest that we care more about the sex lives of our leaders that their real lives of our soldiers, that is a pretty loaded statement. >> it worries me because it does speak to a moral recklessness. the casual arrogance with which we
president at that time, in 1956, was, of course, dwight eisenhower. republican. he was running for re-election against the democratic candidate that year, adlai stevenson. talk about an october surprise. that year it was eight days before election day. both candidates are forced to deal with an unexpected and genuine giant foreign policy crisis. >> on sunday the israeli government ordered total mobilization. on monday, their armed forces penetrated deeply into egypt and to the vicinity of the suez canal, nearly 100 miles away. and on tuesday, the british and french governments delivered a 12-hour ultimatum to israel and egypt, now followed up by armed attack against egypt. the united states was not consulted in any way about any phase of these actions. nor were we informed of them in advance. >> president eisenhower sounding kind of mad, right? the u.s. had not been informed about the attack ahead of time. because ike had made clear to our allies, to england specifically, that he didn't want another big multi-country conflict in the world. he'd worked with the u.n. to keep that attack
. the war was still on, it was still dangerous, and it was eisenhower who ended it. but that is a different story. he let it be known he might use the atomic bomb. we might use it -- he was able to end the war. truman set up loyalty programs in this country. he was being accused of being communistic -- having communists in the government, have been disloyal people, that was why then we were losing the war. people were sabotaging us. so he set up this kind of state which we still have with us now. we do not have loyalty oaths anymore, but eisenhower later called it the industrial military complex, which runs half the economy and which is very warlike. it makes us go into countries we do not understand their history, we do not understand their culture, but if we think they are going to become the mistake we send in the army. we get beaten badly, as we did in vietnam. then years pass and we do it again -- we go into iraq, into afghanistan, still. it set a postwar pattern, meaning post-korea, that we are living with today. it starts back then. >> i have got to rescue some personal questions. it
. johnson, like kennedy, like eisenhower, like sherman, from truman about three presidents were on record as was the majority of congress is saying the united states, headed the free world and was still a very strong cold war climate. of course the bay of pigs would have been just a couple years before that in 1862, that the united states had the responsibility to protect the independence of nations from communistic russia. this may south vietnam. now, kennedy had raised troop levels. i won't go into all the things that truman and eisenhower did, but right alone, we are very heavily involved in protect and south vietnam and johnston believed that these prior commitments committed him. he also is a strong cold war era. he is to comment on how the young people protesting simply didn't understand communism because they'd never grown up or had to fight world war ii. they didn't know what appeasement meant in munich, you know, chamberlain forth. the united states must keep its commitments. it was johnson's great misfortune when you either had to fish. kennedy didn't have to do it. >> host: you
eisenhower changed the holiday to veterans day to honor all service members. >>> in honor of world war ii veterans came to washington for the weekend. we caught up with them at the world war ii memorial that honored veterans with a wreath laying today and one man shared with us how he found out the war was over. >> we came back to pearl harbor thinking i was going to join a group that was going to make a landing on japan. that was kind of in my mind and we got there and they started firing off guns and flares and everything and i thought we were under attack again, but it come to be the war was over. >> in the next moment mr. thompson was overcome with emotion saying that today's events made him feel so important all these years later. >>> we have a news alert from alexandria, investigators wanting you to take a close look at some very dramatic surveillance video. if you know the two men holding up this 7-eleven on kenmore avenue, the crime happened almost two weeks ago, the night hurricane sandy hit and it might be related to other crimes. >> been a few in this area and my understanding
. the early ads from the eisenhower campaign are 20 seconds long, said the eisenhower campaign spent about a million dollars in tv commercials that year. those considered a lot of money. but after the success of the eisenhower campaign, adlai stevenson decided he should do commercials, too. said the 196 election was a rematch of stevenson versus eisenhower and stephen and that's another sense that, every candidate has done tv ads. the importance of having a television personality became very important. so stevenson was kind of awkward on television. he didn't seem to enjoy being in front of the camera as opposed to john kennedy, who asserted bill for television. kennedy actually hired film crews. he was so confident about its image in the way he projected himself that he hired a documentary film crew, even in the primaries. i'm one of the first way behind the is called primary. it follows kennedy and hubert humphrey during one of the primaries in the 1960 election. of course it's legendary about how good kennedy looked on television during the debates. so this whole idea of being comfortab
in 1954, it was president eisenhower who is going to speak. an indian woman sitting on a bench by the banquet hall thought that she recognized the woman. halfway down, pat remembered the woman and returned where the woman was sitting. she spoke with a woman and asked her if they had not yet met previously. she asked about her stay in the u.s. and implied on what she was doing in the hallway. the woman explained that she was returning to india in a few days and hope to catch a glance of the president before she went home. she then arranged for the woman to be given a seat at the dinner so that she could hear the speech as well as see the president. nixon then left the hall to continue on to the engagement. i used the story because i think it exemplifies several key points i wish to make about pat and her public role. particularly about the role of foreign diplomats. first, she met the woman during one of her travels as first lady. the traveling she did as first and second lady was the best part of her job. as a political wife. second, she was just a young woman who had come to t
which president eisenhower was going speak they came across an indian woman sitting on a bench outside the hall. pat thought she recognized the woman asked if dick did. when he said no they continued down the stairs. halfway down she remembered the woman and made her husband return. she spoke with the woman and if they had met previously. woman replied they had pat asked about the stay in the u.s. and inquired what she was doing in the hall way. the woman explained she was returning to indian why in a few days and hoped to glimpse of the president. pat arranged to be given a seat at the dinner so she could hear the speech as well as see the president. nixon then left the hall to continue on to the previous engagement. i used the story to begin the talk because i think it brings to light a couple of key points i wish to bring to light about pat nixon and her public role and the role of foreign diplomat. pat met the woman during her travel as second lead. the traveling she did as first and second lead was the past of the job as a political wife. second, this woman was not the wife a amba
and eisenhower. eisenhower began 1940 as lieutenant colonel, executive officer of an infantry regiment. marshall reached out and said that's who you need to be supreme allied commander. >> how did marshall rise the way he rose without going to battle. having the battle scars of world war i or world war ii. >> it was interesting. marshall didn't know him particularly well. all he knew was that eisenhower had been an aide to macarthur in the philippines in the 1930s, which was not a big boost. he rose so quickly. first of all, because the guy who was having plans in the army on pearl harbor day kind of blew up on the launchpad marshall said get that highsen hour guy in here. they called him up from texas, said get up here. he sat on a suitcase on a train. brigadier general eisenhower, newly promoted. he came up, he walked into marshall's office one week after pearl harbor, december 14th, 1941. marshall looked up and said, tell me how to fight the war in the pacific. eisenhower said how long do i have? >> wow. >> marshall said, this afternoon. that afternoon eisenhower put on marshall's desk a thre
retirement. c-span: here's what he said about general eisenhower, who put him on the ticket in '52: "he was very charming and warm socially, but he was a hard ass. he had to be to lead the allied victory in europe. he was a tough sob. as you know, he didn't endorse me in 1960 until he absolutely had to. that was pretty devastating to my campaign because everyone loved eisenhower, and there i was, running a very close race against kennedy. >> guest: i think that what eisenhower had done in 1960, by waiting so long to endorse nixon, really hurt nixon, because nixon felt that he had been a loyal soldier to eisenhower from 1952 to 1960, that he had served him well. nixon felt so indebted to him because eisenhower really gave him his first foreign policy lessons, sent him around the world and so forth. so i think that nixon -- he valued loyalty so much, and when eisenhower didn't express it when nixon thought he should have, he was disappointed. c-span: you tell a story about a visit by pat buchanan -- a call from pat buchanan around the whole 1992 race. how close were they? >> guest: well,
of those buildings are still standing today. eisenhower began the building of the interstate highway system. i do not think we have one person in the nation who would say, the in a state highway system was a huge mistake. we should have never built it. it is a waste of money. maybe it may have promoted some carbonization that we may not like. overall, it strengthens the nation. we need another jobs initiative. if we get the fiscal discussions behind us, we can talk broadly about jobs. the other thing we have to be able to talk about is the issue of income inequality, the wealth gap. for african-americans and latinos, the recession hit us hard. we lost a lot of job -- a lot of ground in jobs and housing. the notion is 1/3 communities of color. as -- the nation is 1/3 communities of color. we have to talk about the interdependence. we have to educate people about the interdependence. when we talk about lifting up, investing in, creating jobs in communities of color, it will benefit the entire country. that is an important part of how we think, how we message, how we talk about these things, p
. johnson, like kennedy, like eisenhower, like truman -- forget about johnson -- from truman, eisenhower and kennedy, all three presidents, were on record as was the majority of the congress, of saying that the united states, the head of the free world, in what was sill still a very strong cold war climate. the bay of pigs happened just before that in 1962 -- the united states had the responsibility to protect the independence of nations from communist aggression. this meant south vietnam. now, kennedy had raised troop levels. i won't go into all the things that truman and eisenhower did, but right along we are very heavily involved in protecting south vietnam, and johnson believed that these prior commitments committed him. he also was a strong colored warrior. he used to comment often on how the young people who were protesting simply didn't understand communism because they had never really grown up and had to fight world war ii, didn't know what amazement meant automenment, and chamberlain and so forth, give into the nazis. the united states must keep it commitments. it must be stron
joint chiefs, and eisenhower new all about faulty militaried a series and was able to speak with his supreme authority about the dangers as well as the advantages of military advice. so he was a very useful ally to president kennedy. >> tide ted widmer, on the secret recordings of john f. kennedy. tonight. >> booktv sat down with wayne hsieh. it's just under 20 minutes. >> u.s. naval academy, west pointers and the civil war, is your book. what do you mean by the old army? >> guest: the old army is a term commonly used by historians. actually it's a time from the time period referring to the regular army. there's a joke that the old army is the army before every war. so there's a bunch of old army. so my book actually starts with the professionalization of the army and it's about how that process occurs and plays out in the civil war. >> host: give us a snapshot of what the old army, prior the war of 1812, was like. >> guest: before the war of 1812, and this is drawing on really historical literature by historians -- the army before the war of 1812 is a nonprofessional. it ov
for infrastructure. there is not the money at any local, or federal, do the things that eisenhower in n the 1950's, the gornment has done all along. toif you compare e us, mark, nations, were ist in terms of inastructure. >> i think that the barriers is serious m matter to discussbut is alternative. there is no reason we cannot do both. climate change is not going to in a hurry but we have to address a. >> weatherman made it or nature made it, t the sea is rising. absolutely. >> whether man made it or nature have to fix the electrical grid. >> in virginia and parts of , th talk about production. we have to come to grips with tha infrastructure important. put thehave to there.es in >> politicians are neverer -- we goingngo get there unless politicians get honest actually is happening here. the percentage of money we spend on government has shifted from building bridges and highways schools, those things we government, to individiduals,to for whatever reason. not be honestll this. until they are, he will not have o bud bridges and the electrical grids or do that. >> would have made more sense for ob
. that is it breaking of the unions and created the boom that eisenhower had. if these uon heads go forward. this could hurt t economy. >> tracey, you made the point about the retailers, it could hurt the consumer spending as well the economy needs that right now. and economist looking to the holiday shopping season to get big numbers out. >> cheril, i am a last minute shopper and i disagree that they have everything in for the season. stuff comes in down to the wire in so many small businesses if you don't have what i am looking for when i generally geout there, i am not buying it that hurts the over all economy. and look. at the unionshat are you doing? people are dying for jobs and you are basic lie treating it like you throw it away. nand why the only place they are growing in the municipal. private sector lrned from steel workers and airlines and education and pier point twines as well >> i am curious. what do you think. talk and it is it fine with just the accent. we are seeing a sea ship. >> two sides to every story and there has to be shared sacrifice. and as far as hostess. management didn't k
su voto contar... "cuando vine aqui estaba roosevelt y de ahi eisenhower, gerald ford, everybody, 13 presidentes" recuerde que todavia tiene tiempo para votar.. en el distrito de columbia las urnas cierran a las ocho de la noche... mientras tanto organizaciones sin fines de lucro reunen a sus miembros para realizar un centro de llamadas instando a los votantes... silvana quiroz esta en la federacion sindical de trabajadores y nos trae los detalles...silvana!! ... en esta emision especial nos acompanan en el estudio las estrategas mari-cruz magowan, analista republicana y cecilia munoz, analista democrata... gracias por acompanarnos esta tarde... buenas tardes, en multiples locaciones aun estan las puertas abiertas para votar, asi que si esta por salir, la temperatura actualmente es de... en horas de la noche se espera una temperatura minima de... vientos... y cielos... atencion maÑana miercoles, esperamos precipitaciones, la probabilidad es de 50% a partir d elas nueve de la maÑana... en horas de la noche y debido a las bajas temperaturas, se esperan copos de nieve...las precipita
seemed in her public image. dwight eisenhower had known princess elizabeth during world war ii when he was in london, he had what he called was a devoted friendship with king george next, and he entertained the teenage princess at his london apartment where he served her prime ribs of beef according to instructions, nice and rare. in 1957, she was given a short trip by her biographers. according to a horrible research and in an interview, rick buchanan, who was the protocol, was with the royal couple throughout their six days in the united states. which began in jamestown and williamsburg and ended in new york city and included an impromptu visit to a supermarket in suburban maryland. ruth gave me an impromptu and valuable personal perspective on her conduct its queen and her relationship with her husband, prince philip. one of my favorite descriptions was of a moment on the president's airplane when philip was immersed in the sports section of the newspaper and ignoring his wife's questions on the postcards to their children. when she pressed him, he got flustered. it was so interesti
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 354 (some duplicates have been removed)